ORAL HEALTH

Good oral health plays a major role in overall well-being. Daily brushing and flossing are important because oral health affects the health of the entire body. Not brushing and flossing daily can allow plaque to build up along your gum line, creating an environment where additional bacteria can accumulate and lead to more serious problems. It is also important that good oral health for children begin at infancy.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

  • African Americans are among the racial/ethnic groups that have the poorest oral health in the U.S.
  • The greatest disparity of children with tooth decay is seen in African Americans.
  • African Americans aged 35-44 years of age experience untreated tooth decay nearly twice as often as white Americans.
  • The 5-year survival rate of oral pharyngeal cancers among African American men (36%) is almost half of that for white Americans (61%).
  • Periodontal disease is greater in African Americans than almost all other racial groups.

AAHP spreads awareness of the impact of oral health on disease prevention and also provides oral health education, information and resources for good oral health at events and presentations throughout Montgomery County.

Dental brushes

Oral health booth at the Health Freedom Celebration Walk

TAKE A SCREENING

❝ My daughter Elisa is always on the go, and brushing teeth is not the first thing on her mind. Thankfully, AAHP's outreach program teaches children the importance of good dental hygiene. They provided free screenings, discounted dental services, and hundreds of backpacks filled with toothpaste and floss. The AAHP gives me the confidence of knowing that Elisa is brushing down her chances for cancer as an adult. 

❝ But we are also each other’s best resource. Preventing type 2 diabetes and managing diabetes involves the entire family. Cook a balanced meal. Share a brisk walk. Talk with your family about your health and your family’s diabetes risk. Schools, work sites and places of worship can also be part of the diabetes prevention and management solution. What we can do alone to fight diabetes and its consequences, we can do so much more effectively together.❞   –NIDDK, NIH

The African American Health Program is funded and administered by the Montgomery County Department of Health and Human Services and implemented by McFarland & Associates, Inc.
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